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My name's Jaireh. By day, I'm a Lead UX Designer for a big bookstore a big telecom company. I have also been: a designer of many things like this and this.Welcome to my internet Wunderkammer.

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A great resource for appropriate use of motion graphics in interface design

A great resource for appropriate use of motion graphics in interface design

Disney Animation Principles

1) Slow In Slow Out - This principle describes the inertia of objects. A motion is introduced by acceleration and the final position is predictable by the deceleration of the object. So, »Slow In and Slow Out« is easier to follow and appears to be faster.

2) Follow Through -  explains that objects in the real world don’t stop suddenly, but the motion concludes in a contrary motion. It can be used to underline the limits in the Interface (e.g. the bounce at the end of a list). It highlights the end of a motion.

3) Anticipation - prepares the user for the upcoming motion by a contrary motion at the beginning to grab the user’s attention – A golfer making a swing has to swing the club back first. »Anticipation« highlights the beginning of a motion.

4) Squash and Stretch - This principle conveys how soft objects can transform under speed and collision. It gives a sense of weight and flexibility to an object. A ball stretches at higher speed, and compresses at collision. It highlights the in be-tween and the end of a motion.

5) Arcs - This principle describes that real objects don’t move on straight lines. Most natural actions occur along an arched trajectory. This indicated the beginning and the end of a motion. »Arcs« highlights the in between and the end of a motion.
6) Secondary Animation - Adding secondary actions to the main action gives a scene more life, and can help to support the main action. »Secondary Action« explains that the motion of real objects has impact on other objects. It highlights the in be-tween and the end of a motion.

(Source: ui-transitions.com)

Another great resource for highlighting great mobile ui

Another great resource for highlighting great mobile ui

a great  blog pointing out beautiful details in user interfaces that make a big difference

a great blog pointing out beautiful details in user interfaces that make a big difference

a useful  book that could be helpful for designing icons

a useful book that could be helpful for designing icons

five considerations for touch interface design: 

1) design for immediate access

2) touch is the new click 

3) create a window of perception 

4) design for real hand sizes

5) touch feedback is key

useful  pattern library of mobile design patterns ran by Mari Sheibley

useful pattern library of mobile design patterns ran by Mari Sheibley

Mobile Patterns is also a  very useful resource  for mobile patterns 

Mobile Patterns is also a very useful resource for mobile patterns 

Android’s finally released a very helpful guidelines and human interface guidelines document 

Android’s finally released a very helpful guidelines and human interface guidelines document 

an interesting navigational framework for tablet devices from TAT for RIM